National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2021 Redesign - GreenTech

National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2021 Redesign

National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2021 Redesign

National Occupational Classification (NOC) 2021 Redesign

By GTR

This notice aims to advise all stakeholders and users of the National Occupational Classification (NOC) that there will be a major structural revision in 2021. The new NOC has been scheduled for release early next year.

It is every ten years that the National Occupational Classification (NOC) goes through a major structural revision. The input from relevant stakeholders will be invaluable in helping update these occupational groups through a consultation process. 

The NOC is a collaborative partnership between Statistics Canada (STC) and Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) that has been developed over time through public input in revisions for changes in the economy and work itself; this process will continue with 2021 release (10-year cycle).

The current NOC structure (NOC 2016) is categorized based on two major attributes of jobs, the “Broad Occupational Category” and the “Skill Level”, as classification criteria. 

The former refers to what kind of work you do with respect to your educational discipline or field study while the latter determines how skilled an occupation may be at any given time depending on its complexity level.

A new “Skill Level” is suggested to be added to the current categorization, which will clarify that distinction in formal training or education actually required among unit groups, especially “Skill Level B”, which offers a wide range of educational requirements or formal training. 

The NOC 2016 “Skill Level B” category contains all jobs that typically need two to three years of postsecondary education at a community college, institute of technology, or CÉGEP, or two to five years of apprenticeship training.

In the NOC 2016, 211 jobs (42 percent) were classed as “Skill Level B,” resulting in a disproportionately broad category and restricting the capacity to assess differences among a large number of occupations.

 

Another observation made during the revision process was that the NOC’s usage of the “Skill Level” category may be confusing because training and education, which are the key building blocks of the NOC’s “Skill Level” classification, are not considered “skills” in the labor market. Many countries and organizations are now working on building their own skills taxonomy (which includes concepts such as numeracy and literacy). As a result, it was considered suitable for the NOC to remove the “Skill Level” classification.

The NOC 2021 revision will alter the “Skill Level” framework by establishing a new classification expressing the degree of Training, Education, Experience, and Responsibilities (TEER) necessary for each occupation.

The new “TEER” classification redefines the occupation’s qualifications by rethinking the sort of education, training, and experience necessary for entrance, as well as the complexity and obligations that come with the job. In general, the higher the variety and complexity of occupational activities, the more formal education and training, prior experience, on-the-job training, and, in some cases, the responsibility necessary to properly perform the set of duties for that occupation.

Legislative and senior management positions are classed as Management in “TEER” 0 because they typically need and have a considerable degree of expertise, knowledge, and duties connected to resource planning and directing.

Occupations classed as “TEER” 1 often need a university education or prior experience and proficiency in subject matter knowledge from a related career classified as “TEER 2.”

Occupations that typically require two to three years of post-secondary education or apprenticeship training of at least two years, or occupations with supervisory or significant safety responsibilities, are classified as “TEER” 2, while occupations that require less than two years of post-secondary education or on-the-job training, training courses, or specific work experience of more than six months are classified as “TEER” 3.

TEER 4 or TEER 5 occupations often require a high school diploma or no formal schooling. The whole NOC 2021 restructure may be found in Schedule B.

These revisions greatly enhance how the NOC categorization accounts for differences in formal training and educational requirements, as well as how it represents skill and knowledge growth that occurs via on-the-job experience.

Simultaneously, it improves the homogeneity of the distribution of unit groups within the classification and answers issues about the “Skill Level” categorization and allocation of unit groups among them.

The NOC redesign for 2021 abandons the present NOC four “Skill Level” classifications in favor of an innovative six-grouping “TEER” categorization. This adjustment is required for a number of reasons. For starters, the phrase “Skill Level” is frequently misunderstood by many stakeholders. This update will help to clear up any doubt. Second, some NOC users build or assume a low- and high-skill classification arbitrarily. As the TEER more effectively represents variances in occupational needs, this redesign shifts away from high/low skill classification, which will benefit the analysis of occupations.

The transfer from the “Skill Level” to the “TEER” category more evenly distributes jobs among the “TEER categories.” The following tables describe the changes in the distribution of unit groupings.

NOC 2016

Skill Level A

 28%

Skill Level B

 42%

Skill Level C

 24%

Skill Level D

 6%

NOC 2021

TEER Category 0

 9%

TEER Category 1

 19%

TEER Category 2

 31%

TEER Category 3

 14%

TEER Category 4

 18%

TEER Category 5

 9%

Note: The NOC 2021 final distribution may change when the structure is finalized.

The current National Occupational Classification 2016 version’s structure and format are built on a four-tiered hierarchical organization of occupational categories with progressive levels of disaggregation. It includes broad occupational classifications as well as major, minor, and unit groupings.

NOC 2021 will adopt a five-tiered hierarchical organization of occupational groups with progressive levels of disaggregation, including broad, major, sub-major, minor, and unit groupings.

The National Occupational Classification 2021 structure is built on two fundamental occupational categorizations: occupational categories and TEER categories, both of which are indicated in the first two digits of the NOC 2021 5-digit number. The five-digit code will be formatted as follows: XX.XXX. Details on the two major categories may be found in Schedule B.

It is crucial to highlight that the restructuring of the NOC will have substantial ramifications for many Statistics Canada (STC) Surveys, including the Labour Force Survey (LFS), as well as ESDC programs like the Temporary Foreign Worker Program and Employment Insurance. This shift may have a substantial impact on a variety of programs across other federal ministries, as well as provincial, territorial, and local governments, as well as numerous NOC users.

The NOC 2021 will be issued in early 2021 and will become Statistics Canada’s departmental standard for data collection and dissemination for professions. The new categorization version’s implementation dates will vary depending on when programs, corporations, organizations, or people opt to use it.

For instance, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), in collaboration with ESDC, plans to implement the redesigned NOC structure for the management of temporary and permanent resident programs in spring 2022. These dates will be announced on the IRCC websites as the implementation date approaches.

Statistics Canada will often publish a spreadsheet showing the actual structure of the classification, including unit group numbers and accompanying titles, prior to the publication of a full classification change. We will also give a table of correspondences between the NOC 2016 and NOC 2021 unit groupings and titles.

These items will be available on our website by December 2020. This message is being distributed right now to notify all NOC users of the future change, which is currently being completed. The entire categorization, including Leading Statements, Main Duties, Employment Requirements, Example Titles, Inclusions, Exclusions, and Additional Information, will be available in early 2021.

NOC 2016

The skill type category is…

when the first digit is…

Management occupations

0

Business, finance, and administration occupations

1

Natural and applied sciences and related occupations

2

Health occupations

3

Occupations in education, law and social, community, and government services

4

Occupations in art, culture, recreation, and sport

5

Sales and service occupations

6

Trades, transport and equipment operators, and related occupations

7

Natural resources, agriculture, and related production occupations

8

Occupations in manufacturing and utilities

9

NOC 2016 skill level criteria – education/training and other criteria

The Skill Level category is…

when the second digit is…

Skill Level A

0 or 1

Skill Level B

2 or 3

Skill Level C

4 or 5

Skill Level D

6 or 7

Skill Level A

  • University degree (bachelor’s, master’s or doctorate)

Skill Level B

  • Two to three years of post-secondary education at community college, institute of technology or CÉGEP
    or
  • Two to five years of apprenticeship training
    or
  • Three to four years of secondary school and more than two years of on-the-job training, occupation-specific training courses, or specific work experience
  • Occupations with supervisory responsibilities are also assigned to skill level B.
  • Occupations with significant health and safety responsibilities (e.g., firefighters, police officers, and licensed practical nurses) are assigned to skill level B.

Skill Level C

  • Completion of secondary school and some short-duration courses or training specific to the occupation
    or
  • Some secondary school education, with up to two years of on-the-job training, training courses, or specific work experience

Skill Level D

  • Short work demonstration or on-the-job training
    or
  • No formal educational requirements

Skill level is referenced in the code for all occupations with the exception of management occupations. For all non-management occupations, the second digit of the numerical code corresponds to skill level. Skill levels are identified as follows: level A – 0 or 1; level B – 2 or 3; level C – 4 or 5; and level D – 6 or 7.

Title of Hierarchy

Format

 Digit

Represents:

Broad Category

X

First Digit – X

 Occupational categorization

Major Group 

XX

Second Digit xX

 TEER categorization

Sub-major Group

XX.X

 xx.X

 Top level of the Sub-Major Group

Minor Group

XX.XX

 xx.XX

Hierarchy within the Sub-Major Group

Unit Group

XX.XXX

 xx.XXX

Hierarchy within the Minor Group

Note: The first digit identifies the Occupation, the second digit identifies the TEER. Therefore, the first 2 digits put together are identified as the Major Group. The next 3 digits identify their hierarchy within the groups.

Broad Category – Occupation

when the first digit is…

Legislative and senior management occupations

0

Business, finance, and administration occupations

1

Natural and applied sciences and related occupations

2

Health occupations

3

Occupations in education, law and social, community, and government services

4

Occupations in art, culture, recreation, and sport

5

Sales and service occupations

6

Trades, transport and equipment operators, and related occupations

7

Natural resources, agriculture, and related production occupations

8

Occupations in manufacturing and utilities

9

The Training, Education, Experience and Responsibility (TEER)

when the second digit is…

Management – TEER

0

Completion of a university degree (bachelor’s, master’s, or doctorate);

or

Previous experience and expertise in subject matter knowledge from a related occupation found in TEER 2 (when applicable).

1

Completion of a post-secondary education program of two to three years at community college, institute of technology or CÉGEP;

or

Completion of an apprenticeship training program of two to five years;

or

Occupations with supervisory or significant safety (e.g. police officers and firefighters) responsibilities;

or

Several years of experience in a related occupation from TEER 3 (when applicable).

2

Completion of a post-secondary education program of less than two years at community college, institute of technology or CÉGEP;

or

Completion of an apprenticeship training program of less than two years;

or

More than six months of on-the-job training, training courses or specific work experience with some secondary school education;

or

Several years of experience in a related occupation from TEER 4 (when applicable).

3

Completion of secondary school;

or

Several weeks of on-the-job training with some secondary school education; or

Experience in a related occupation from TEER 5 (when applicable).

4

Short work demonstration and no formal educational requirements.

5

Source: Statcan

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *